We Are Korean Women and Hansan Sogokju.

We are Korean Women

On Thursday, May 7th we celebrated another #WMLABTALKS event, our inspirational thought-provoking lectures. WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN!

Along with Hye-Rim Kwon, a Korean journalist, we talked tête à tête about how Korean women view their past and face modernity.

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Hye Rim and her friends.

This was our plan for the day and sticked to it quite enough.

Our Schedule Program for the day.

The first thing was the coffee mingle and taste the traditional Spanish tapa pantumaca, a Catalonian breakfast or snack. People loved this simple but tasty Spanish dish.

You might be surprised by the name, “The Spanish FIKA” but there is a sentimental story behind. FIKA was our first #wmlabtalk and we liked very much this unique Swedish coffee break that we wanted to pay tribute to it by named it like that.

After we recharged our batteries it was time to get inspired…

We began our presentation. We talked about women, about Korean women and Korean Women’s greatest achievements. We talked about democracy, gender equality and the increase of women’s power in Korean society.

Important Korean Women

However we wanted not only to celebrate Korean Women’s achievements but to go just a little more further. More than spectators we wanted women to interact and discuss. We intended so to set a female-focused collective dialogue to break down stereotypes and go beyond clichés. It was difficult though, always is.

 

We thought that the only way to do it properly was through a “World Café” dynamic.

The World Café.

According to Wikipedia, the “World Café” is a structured conversational process that fosters an open and intimate discussion and link ideas within a larger group to get access to the “collective intelligence” in the room.

In World Café the focus is on exploring on themes and not on problem-solving and that was what we were after for: to enrich our perspective on Korean Women and give a certain basis for a further intimate reflection.

Small groups of six or seven participants sat around the tables and discussed open-ended questions for a structured amount of time. Individuals switched tables where a “table host” at the new table briefly welcomed people and filled them in on highlights of the earlier discussion.

In this way participants gather a wide range of inputs that help strengthen the ‘ecology’ of the conversation.

The world café session

These were our questions…

Korea has come so far in fifty years, how have women driven that growth?; What are the challenges that women face in Korean society?; What are the challenges that South Korean Women will face in the future?

I think that this World Café was able to deepen the discussion about being a woman in South Korea and maybe widen our viewpoints.

After the World Café, Hye-Rim Kwon taught us about the Sogokju, the Korean 1500 year old beverage and its legend around…

The story of Sogokju. “A long time ago, during the Joseon Dynasty a man who was on his way to Seoul to take a state exam , stopped at a tavern…”

After the storytelling we toasted with Sogokju and we could not find a better closure for our workshop than to read, both in Korean and in English, some excerpts of Simcheongjeon a story of Korean Pansori storytelling tradition.

Hye and I asked people to put on sleep masks… and then, with Simcheongjeon’s own words: we asked people to remove their masks and open their mind and their heart…

Simcheong is a girl whose mother died in childbirth. She cares for her blind father… She is the perfect model of Confucian devotion…We found interested to end with this story and use her “own” words to foster our imagination, forgetting about the story and focusing on the philosophical message.

 

 

 

The Grand Narrative

We are Korean Women WomenlabkoreaI’ve been asked to pass on the following:

*******WOMENLABKOREA is a creative space to test ideas, initiatives, and projects, a space to co-create, to co-design and prototype with other women, a supportive space where risks can be taken.

WOMENLABKOREA is about social innovation, empowerment and entrepreneurship!

The purpose is to help women step out of their comfort zones to improve their lives and the lives of women around them.

Next Thursday, May 7th we are hosting another #WMLABTALK called “We are Korean Women.”

We have conceived of these #WMLABTALKS as events where we can share and understand more about our lives; events to discover more about our wishes and hopes.

We wanted to create a space where women can speak freely and be ready to challenge stereotypes.

Furthermore, we wanted to dedicate a time to celebrate us, to celebrate women’s rhythms and women’s vision of…

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Cocido madrileño, or how the Holy Inquisition helped to invent a dish

As I wrote in Spain meets Korea there is not just one Spain but many. Basque people, Catalonian people, Galician people, Andalusian people, Madrilenian people…They all have their own language, culture and history.

However, Spain is rapidly connected to siesta, sangría, paella or matadors.Spain is siesta, sangría, paella or matadors, but much more. All these clichés and stereotypes are either born from a lack of knowledge or a simplification of reality.

Spain is diverse and we are here to show it. So welcome to a new culinary lab-adventure! How about a lively, colorful, virtual tour of Madrid, complete with a tasting of cocido madrileño? Welcome on board!

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Cocido Madrileño, in La bola Restaurant in Madrid

Last Thursday, April 16th we started start the morning with a cocido madrileño cooking demonstration.

Cocido madrileño is a pork meat, potato and chickpea stew that dates back to the Middle Ages. This fragrant, rich hearty stew is Madrid’s signature dish.

At its most basic a cocido, a stew or a pot-au-feu (French) consists of a big pot (known as olla) where you put everything (vegetables, meats, legumes) in and let it boil.

In fact, every country has its pot-au-feu!, says Leah Messinger (Afar, Spain’s Progressive Dinner: Cocido Madrileño) and Cocido Madrileño is Spain´s pot-au-feu.

Madrid

The region of Madrid

I have read some cocido madrileño recipes. I give more references at the end of the post. The one below is from Spain info:

Ingredientes del cocido diapo

Photo credit: Petra Sjögren

And do not miss the video of this English chef settled in Madrid, talking about Madrid and cooking its signature dish, the cocido.

I really like cocido very much, I find it tasty and a life guard-dish!: you can eat for two-three days with the leftovers of the cocido. There is nothing to be
is thrown away and you can “re-invent” the dish every time. For example, after first day’s feast you can make ropa vieja, a fried mix of chickpeas and meat (a speechless sacrilege to be committed: ropa vieja with a fried egg!). I love the croquetas made from the cocido’s meat, they are really tasty. Finally I like the Pringá too, which is made with the fried meat leftovers and bread.

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Photo taken by Petra Sjögren.

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Photo taken by Petra Sjögren

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Mónica García, Spanish, incidental cook, blogger and friend.

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Our kitchen in Hillside Residence.

And while the cocido was over the flames, we began our journey back in time to the 16th century – the era of the Spanish Hapsburgs (Austrias in Spanish), the royal family. In this web you can find some tips to plan your visit to Austrias Madrid.

But, let’s have a pinch of history…

You might like to know that the chickpea was introduced in Spain many centuries ago, very likely by the Carthaginian, however the Spanish word for this legume is garbanzo, from the Mozarabic word arbanço.

Cocido madrileño is probably the most representative dish of Madrid’s cuisine. Like many other Spanish dishes (e.g. Paella Valenciana) its origins are humble. Being prepared by the popular classes firstly, it is only at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th that the cocido became popular among the high classes and even the Royal Family! –however, ingredients were not the same and by the quantity of meat you might recognize the “royal” cocido.

The cocido is believed to be created in the late fifteenth century as an evolution of the Ashkenazi Jewish cholent (טשאָלנט), (literally: -chaud-, hot, and –lent-, slow)- and the Sephardic (Spanish) Jewish dish adafina, a hearty long-cooking dish of chickpeas, garlic, lamb and seasoned stock, prepared the night before the Jewish Sabbath.

As the pot could remain over a low flame without an attendant, the violation of Jewish religious law was avoided.

Under the power of the Inquisition, the traditional recipe of adafina underwent a change (now you understand from where does the title come).

The Marranos (Jews living in the Iberian Peninsula who converted or were forced to convert to Christianity), in order to prove the sincerity of their conversions, had to incorporate pork (lard, bacon, chorizo (pork sausage) and morcilla (blood sausage) into their adafines, shaping the stews from which cocido madrileño and its dozen of variants are natural product.

So by the late 15th and early 16th centuries, all these stews were called, interchangeably, adafinas, hamin (or cholent, in Hebrew), trasnochados (in Spanish) cocido (this was commonly used by the late 1500 and it received its appellation madrileño during the 17th century) or olla podrida (that literally means “rotten pot” or hodgepodge). The olla podrida manchega (native from Castilla La Mancha)–whose base was pork and beans- was a popular dish in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Cocido madrileño’s popularity was growing enormously. It was one of the most consumed dishes in Madrid and the most popular, after callos a la madrileña, the Madrid-style tripe. Cocido was included in menus of all kinds of establishments like taverns.

Later, after the Civil War its popularity decreased. Nowadays cocido madrileño is mostly a homemade dish for special occasions. It is more pricey and you can find it not only in bars –offered as menu del día (set menu)-, but also in hotel restaurants as a gourmet specialty.

And then it was time to enjoy the violin recital by Sammy Park and to serve the cocido on the table…

Cocido Madrileño cartel en coreano

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Sammy Park. Photo taken by Petra Sjögren.

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Sammy Park. Photo taken by Petra Sjögren.

And we did it traditionally. You have to overturn the pot and the ingredients of cocido must be served separately. Each serving is known as vuelco (overturn or twist).

The first course or vuelco was a soup served with noodles -the stock of the cocido is drained and the noodles (fideos, Spanish) are cooked in it. In the second vuelco, the chickpeas come in a serving dish with the vegetables–the sautéed cabbage, the carrot and the turnip (not the onion which is added to the broth to give it flavor, but it has to be later removed). And then with the third vuelco, the meat is served.

20150416_123323_LLSBut where to go to have cocido in Madrid?.

Playing with the idea of the vuelcos, an recent article in El País (New twists on Madrid’s most famous dish), introduces us the best places where to have cocido madrileño.

For the fourth year running, the capital has staged a six-week event to promote cocido Madrileño (the route of the cocido madrileño). Twenty-six restaurants have taken part and the article describes us the unique take of each of them.

Ruta del cocido 2015

the Fith Cocido Madrileño Route

But apart from the new restaurants that Camille Lavoix and Andrea Nogueira help us to discover, the classic places are still a marvelous option to enjoy this hearty stew in Madrid.

For example, you can go to Lhardy, one of the first and oldest restaurants of Madrid, located in the centre of Madrid in the Carrera de San Jerónimo street, close to the Congreso de los Diputados (the Spanish Parliament).

Casa LhardyYou can also try Malacatín established in 1895 as a wine bar and located in a much more modest neighborhood, as La Latina, and that on Sundays hosts the El Rastro flea market.

You might love too the Tavern La Bola, located near the Palacio Real where thousands of cocidos have been served since 1870.

We finish our session by thanking Ñ Magazine …..

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Revista Ñ Corea and some participants. Thank you!

… and learning about the Korean artist Kim, Ki-Hoon(김기훈) whose Sunev installation was in our test kitchen.

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SUNEV by Kim, Ki-Hoon (김기훈) What do you see?.

Please, find more recipes and information about this hearty stew at Wikipedia, Afar Magazine or Havers to table.

We are Korean Women! Join the conversation!

Next Thursday 7th May, all of us will be Korean Women!.

WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN is a female-focused collective dialogue to challenge stereotypes and clichés about being a woman in South Korea. Korean journalist Hye-Rim Kwon and I will foster reflection on how Korean women view their past and face modernity.

But more than a workshop, WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN will be a celebration!

We are Korean Women

We are Korean Women(3)We will practise yogafit with Uliana Golovko and taste the traditional Spanish tapa pantumaca, a Catalonian breakfast or snack.

Next, we will enjoy a violin recital of Spanish pieces by Korean violin instructor Kang So Eun.

Following the recital, we will begin our presentation and open dialogue. Korea has come so far in fifty years, how have women driven that growth? What are the challenges that women face in Korean society?

We seek to break down stereotypes and go beyond cliches by means of a creative and collaborative dialogue, in which there is not a predetermined answer or solution.

Inspired by the Juanita Brown and David Isaacs’ “World Café” methodology, WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN intends to facilitate open and intimate discussion, focusing on exploring on themes rather than on problem-solving, providing an appropriate environment that encourages everyone’s contribution and allows to connect diverse perspectives.

THE WORLD CAFE: Shaping Our Futures Through Conversations That Matter by Juanita Brown and David Isaacs

Then, we will taste and learn about Hansan Sogokju, the 1500 year old beverage with an unique scent and sweet flavor.

Finally we will be captured by Simcheongjeon (심청전), one the stories of Korean Pansori storytelling tradition, officially recognized by UNESCO as an important piece of world culture.prog_14621_1Simcheong is a girl whose mother died in childbirth. She cares for her blind father, with the utmost care, the perfect model of Confucian devotion… [It will be interesting to discuss about this stereotypes in our round table discussions].

“Pansori”, often referred to as Korean Opera, is a type of traditional Korean music.

In “Pansori” two musicians are sharing the spotlight, a singer, named “sorikkun”, and a drummer called ”gosu”. Through his singing, words, and body language, the singer plays the central role while the drummer plays an accompanying role by providing the rhythm and shouting words of encouragement and passion to the performance, which totally reminds me to the Flamenco music in Spain.

In following video you can watch and listen to Jen Shyu, playing the “sorikkun in a representation sponsored by the National Gugak Center in Seoul, South Korea.

The scenes sung here are from “Drifting Along In the Sea” (범피중류) when Simcheong kills herself by jumping into the water in order to regain her father’s sight and “Simbongsa Opens His Eyes” (심봉사 눈 드는 대목) when her father regains his sight. It was recorded in 2013.

In our WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN we will read an excerpt from that final scene, when her father suddenly regains his sight and, like a wave across the earth, all people and even animals recover from blindness and see the bright world…

I want women to see! I want women to regain their self-esteem! There are lots of stereotypes and lots of glass ceilings to break, but the first ones are only in our minds!.

Prepare to be surprised!

If you wish to participate in “We are Korean Women” meeting on Thursday 7th May, please complete this succinct survey http://goo.gl/forms/E6qsPe6mP0 by Wednesday 6th May, to allow us to prepare this meeting with the greatest care.

Korea meets Spain: labs to dive deeper into the Spanish food and culture.

There is not just one Spain but many. Spain is diverse and there are surprising attractions at every turn. Korea meets Spain wishes to show up different elements about the Spanish food and culture as well as to look beyond the Spanish clichés of siesta, sangría, paella or matadors.

Seoul Forest Sculpture by the Spanish artist Jaume Plensa.

Thursday, April 16th

Cocido madrileño (Madrilenian stew) 스페인 마드리드 지역의 코씨도 요리

Description:

A Spanish4FunCooking Lab event. Cocido is a traditional chickpea based stew from Madrid that dates back to the middle Ages. Fragrant and substantial, Cocido is prepared with meat and vegetables and arrives at the table in three courses, known as tres vuelcos. The broth with noodles precedes the legumes and vegetables, which in turn set the stage for the meat.

The audience will enjoy a breathtaking view to Seoul’s skyline in a 250 m2 empty flat only furnished with the perfect table to enhance this Womenlabkorea Luncheon. We will cook the Cocido’s recipe and while our stew is over the flames we will make a virtual trip to The Madrid of the Spanish Habsburgs, known as “the Austrians” in Spanish and will admire the Plaza Mayor, silent witness of bullfights, executions, and coronations.

When overwhelmed by the echoes of the secret culinary life of the crypto-Jews back in the 16th century, a solo violin by Sammy Park will set the stage for the three vuelcos.

Schedule: 9:30AM- 12:15PM

Venue: Hillside Residence

Cocido Madrileño Cocido MadrileñoThursday, April 23rd

Hallyu to Spain.

Description:

A #WMLABTALKS event. Inspirational thought provoking lectures. We will talk about the future of work and the key shifts that women can make to prepare themselves to a future-proof career. Example of both personal and professional reinvention, we will interview the Spanish blogger Mónica García Cabello.

Through her blog (withoutbabymonsters), Mónica García brings the South Korea popular culture to the Spanish audience. She lives in Seoul and loves it. Gifted with a voracious curiosity, every very week she goes in the search of the unexpected city, that she watches, explores and tells us about as soon as her “baby monsters” are Where the Wild Things Are

Schedule: 10:00-12:00

Venue: Hillside Residence

#WMLABTALKS Thursday, May 7th

WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN

Description:

A #WMLABTALKS event. Inspirational thought provoking lectures.

A Korean journalist, Hye-Rim Kwon and Ana Dols, the Spanish catalyst of  WOMENLABKOREA, will talk tête à tête about how do Korean women look at their past and face modernity. WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN will be a female-focused collective dialogue to challenge stereotypes and clichés about being a woman in South Korea.

We will practise yogalates with Uliana Golovko and we will taste our SpanishFIKA” -we like the idea of Swedish FIKA but we fuse it with  the signature pan tumaca Catalonian breakfast or snack-. Finally we will discover Sogokjuand we’ll taste it!-, the 1500 year old beverage, and be captured by Simcheongjeon, a story of the Korean Pansori storytelling tradition. More than a workshop, WE ARE KOREAN WOMEN will be a celebration.

Schedule: 9:30 AM-12:15 PM

Venue: Hillside Residence

We are Korean Women We are Korean Women(4)Monday, May 26

Chocolate con churros (the popular “churros” snack). 마드리드와 오리지널 초코라떼   추러스를 맛보세요

Description:

A Spanish4Fun-Cooking Lab event. Churros, the Spanish fried-dough pastry, are already part of the mainstream Seoulite culture, where there are currently 21 franchise churro brands, 17 of them registered last year. Churros are the quintessential Madrilenian breakfast. Either thin (or sometimes knotted) or long and thick, they are eaten dipped in hot chocolate or café con leche. The recipe in hand, we will be making our own churros and dunk them in a very thick chocolate -the authentic one- dip. And while we indulge ourselves with this popular snack, we will discover the controversial history of churros’ origin, the Latin American variations of the churros, or where to have the best chocolate con churros in Madrid, a city made for foodies.

Schedule: 13:30 AM-15:30

Venue: Seorae Global Village Center 서울글로벌센터 – 서울특별시

CHOCOLATE CON CHURROS in KoreanCHOCOLATE CON CHURROSMonday, June 9th

Paella Valenciana

Description:

A Spanish4Fun-Cooking Lab event. The worldwide-known Paella is a blend of savors and colors from the Mediterranean Sea. The origins of this iconic dish are humble, Paella was originally farmers’ and farm laborers’ food, cooked over a wood fire for the lunchtime meal and traditionally eaten straight from the pan. It was made with rice, plus whatever ingredients were to hand around the rice fields and countryside (the so-called Huerta). We will try the original Paella Valenciana Recipe and travel to Valencia, whose sunlight was the painter Joaquín Sorolla’s inspiration.

Schedule: 13:30 -15:30

Venue: Seorae Global Village Center 서울글로벌센터 – 서울특별시

PAELLA WORKSHOP POSTER 2015 09 JUN(1)Thursday, May 28th

Survival Spanish. Spanish smarts for smart tourists.

Description:

A Spanish4Fun event. Five sessions to help participants to navigate their way through some common scenarios (at the airport, traveling around the city, at the bank, in a restaurant, …), whether they are in Spain or Latin America. Survival Spanish will be useful either to brush up on the Spanish participants already know, or to learn all the useful words and expressions they will need for their trip. We will learn Spanish smarts about the Spanish language, social life and culture.

Timetable: May 28th, June 4th 11th 18th 25th

Schedule: 10:00 AM-11:00AM

Venue: Hillside Residence

Survival Spanish 16 oAre you ready to be surprised?.

Swedish Women, do they have it all?.

Last Thursday, March 11th we enjoyed FIKA at Hillside Residence, in Hannam-dong, Seoul. Petra Sjögren was our fabulous tour guide who shared with us many facts and stories of Sweden, a far away country – although after this Fika I have the feeling it is not so distant any more. (You can follow our board on Pinterest and discover all about Sweden: https://es.pinterest.com/womenlabkorea/wmlabtalks-fika/).

Found on subdisc.com2015-03-12 20.21.082015-03-12 21.42.00Now you might wonder what FIKA is. FIKA is a concept in Swedish culture with the basic meaning “to have coffee”, often accompanied with pastries or sandwiches. Nowadays coffee may be replaced by tea or juice. Sometimes, a sandwich or a small meal may be called FIKA, similar to the English concept of afternoon tea.

But FIKA is more than a Swedish Coffee Break.  The definition given by FIKA KOREA, which promises no less than heaven to me: “a Scandinavian style coffee-house offering premium gourmet coffee and authentic Swedish food”.

FIKA is considered a social institution in Sweden, it means having a break with one’s colleagues, friends, date or family. This practice of taking a break is a common practice at workplaces and central to Swedish life.

Traditionally, FIKA requires sweet, baked goods, especially cinnamon rolls and according to Helene Henderson, author of The Swedish Table, one needs the following for Swedish guests: “to impress, serve a variety of seven freshly baked items and be ready to talk about the weather”. Funnily enough, in our FIKA we intended to talk about everything except the weather. In fact our purpose was to know more about Swedish women (to go beyond myths, stereotypes and preposterous clichés…) and discover if they are really winning the battle of the numbers.

FICKA (8)FICKA (4)90f690b01f4ad4966319d9e4e81fa949Moreover this FIKA had a deeper meaning for me. FIKA was the first in our series of #WMLABTALKS this term. #WMLABTALKS are meant to be inspirational thought-provoking lectures about women and the future of world. In April we are hosting two more!

#WMLABTALKS SEORAE(1) We are Korean Women(5)

We are Korean Women(4)I conceived of these #WMLABTALKS as events where we can share and understand more about our lives; events to discover more about our wishes and hopes. I wanted to create a space where women can speak freely and be ready to challenge stereotypes. Furthermore, I wanted to dedicate a time to celebrate us, to celebrate women’s rhythms and women’s vision of the world´s cultures. To celebrate how far we have come and all that we have conquered. On this topic, Swedish women have something to say.

Sweden ranks as one of the world’s most gender-egalitarian countries, even in terms of language. We just learned that a gender-neutral pronoun, hen will join its binary counterparts han (he) and hon (she) in the new edition of Sweden’s official dictionary.

With an extensive welfare system, Sweden makes it easier for both women and men to balance work and family life. In the Global Gender Gap Report 2013, Sweden is named as a world leader in equality while Korea ranks 111th, out of 136 countries.

In Sweden, women are closer to sharing power and influence equally with men. The knowledge and experience of both sexes are used to foster progress in all fields of Swedish society. When talented women quit their jobs or abandon their chosen profession, not only does the country suffer a great loss of talent, but this lost potential is also painful for the women themselves.

Can we concur that Swedish women have it all? Of course not, there is still room for improvement in many areas, but after Petra’s speech we found Sweden an attractive place to live!

My reflection is that this progress on gender egalitarianism might set Swedish women a step ahead with regards to European or Asian women.  They might be starting another kind of battle. As they are “allowed” to undertake traditionally male roles, they put themselves in a position where they can choose to “opt out”. They can decide to re-invent roles and workplace culture, not following the male lead. They can put value in their own goals rather than trying to fit in the ones recognized and rewarded in a male-dominated society. This shift in views can reconcile the strong disconnect between men and women’s preferred ways of doing things.

I am Spanish and consider that we Spanish women are not in that desirable position. But in a context where many of the ways of working that we have taken for granted for 20 years are disappearing (Lynda Gratton), in a transition to a knowledge-based economy, where rules and practices that determined success in the industrial economy need rewriting, we women and men have an extraordinary opportunity to switch the paradigm and reduce the gender’s gap. There is a correlation between a country’s gender gap and its national competitiveness. Women account for one-half of a country’s potential talent base and a nation’s competitiveness in the long-term depends significantly on whether and how it educates and uses its women’s talent (http://www.weforum.org/reports/global-gender-gap-report-2014) and in the “creative economy” (President Park) there is no talent to spare.

FIKA COVER

“Cooking up a tribute” to the revolutionary Basque cuisine

Ongietorri!, welcome in Euskara, the Basque Country language. That’s how we have started our two workshops in March.

Our friend Hye has published her own version in Korean: [스페인 요리] 스페인 바스크 요리 쿠킹 클래스 (Discovering the Basque gastronomy) – http://blog.naver.com/pyano7/220295989738

BASQUE COUNTRY WORKSHOP HILLSIDE(1)BASQUE COUNTRY WORKSHOP(2)Far more modest than the tribute paid to the American cuisine by the Roca Brothers in their documentary “Cooking Up a Tribute” [the film is the result of the tour that took “El Celler de Can Roca” to the Texas cities of Houston and Dallas; the Mexican cities of Mexico City and Monterrey; Bogota, Colombia and Perú], we want to embark you on a trip around the Basque Country, mostly San Sebastián, to discover this territory and its gastronomic treasures and above all, to pay tribute to the revolutionary Basque Cuisine.
As mentioned by Jesús Rodríguez in “El País”, we wish you to discover “what drives the culinary excellence of a region that is home to five of the world’s best restaurants”.
I guess everything in this culinary experience is about discovery. It was our first cookery class & “pintxos lab” and we did it, as Pickering and Higgins congratulate each other in My Fair Lady’s film. Mónica García Cabello and I we say that we would do it and indeed we did it!.
But a lot of the glory goes to you, dear participants, for you co-created the “pintxos” and that was an awesome experience. We thank you all.

GRUPOGRUPO2Our motto, inspired by Ferrán Adriá, was “the great revolution of the future will be to recognize that the diner is also cook”. And we believe that. We believe that participants should be “more” participants. That is why we will try to carry out this “learning-by-doing” experience in all our workshops, for it goes both ways around: you learn, we learn –a lot- from you. That’s the idea of a cooking lab…And that is where our commitment with innovation begins and so does our biggest challenge: turning people from mere observers into value creators.

Ongietorri to Euskal Herria, “the land of the Basque speakers”, and let the music leads you to the beauty of this country: “Lau teilatu Mikel Erentxun eta Amaia Montero”,

As casual Cicerone, we say a few words about the Basque traditions like the Pelota Vasca and inevitably, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has to be mentioned.

The Guggenheim has had a powerful impact on Bilbao’s transformation, now a mecca for design and architecture but until not long ago, a city full of decaying industrial complexes.

In our trip we walk on the most beautiful urban beach in Europe: la playa de la Concha, in San Sebastián. But everything in the Basque Country revolves around the passion for food, so we have to shift our swimsuits to aprons…

San Sebastián

Revolutionary?. The Basque cuisine took the dishes that were being prepared a century ago and reinvented them over the course of 40 years. We reflect on the drivers of this “spicy” culinary innovation and his/her pioneers, like José Mari Arzak or her daughter Elena. Firstable, the sum of culinary tradition [“txokos”, cookery clubs, and traditional recipes, local and seasonal products] and the so-called “avant-garde”. Secondly, that this (r)evolution has involved everyone: producers, the food and culture industry and the innovation hub.

And after all this talking and reflecting, Mesdames and Messieurs we were happy to introduce you the Marmitako recipe (Tuna Pot). In the euskoguide.com or in Jonathan McCallum’s blog you can find the recipe for this classic Basque meal. But our gift is the Begoña Hualde’s aunt’s recipe, a Tuna Pot recipe from Navarra (another region close to the Country Basque).

portadaAnd while the Marmitako is “over the flames”…We can devote ourselves to Donostia, San Sebastián. San Sebastián has gained significant press for its cuisine, just imagine that the city alone has 15 Michelin stars spread across 7 restaurants and it is also famous for its “pintxos”…

The Vaga Brothers  teach us that “Pintxos” are small finger foods served at bars and taverns, and that is typical to go into a bar in the Basque Country and find the entire counter lined with plates of various “pintxos”. From the verb “pinchar” (to stab or to poke), “pintxos” are served on a small slice of bread and have a toothpick piercing them, hmm…umm yammi. (check all the pictures we have on our Pinterest board https://es.pinterest.com/womenlabkorea/spanish4fun-euskadi-the-basque-country/). Follow WOMENLABKOREA’s board Spanish4Fun. Euskadi, the Basque Country on Pinterest.

DSCF9349DSCF9343And the time comes for the participants to co-design and co-create an appetizing & tasty “pintxo” and decide about ingredients, flavors, colors and textures…And the toughest part of it: to “test” the “pintxos” and the wine…This time it was Australian, next time we hope you will enjoy the slightly sparkling, very dry white wine with high acidity and low alcohol content of a Txacoli…

C360_2015-03-05-15-05-30-093(1)1425427411084 (2)Muchas gracias (thank you, in Spanish), agur (Goodbye in Euskara) or better: gero arte (so long o “hasta pronto” in Spanish).

Have you ever been to a cooking lab?. It is never too late to try it!.

WOMENLABKOREA, a person-centered innovation initiative that uses collaborative methodology and focuses on getting from ideas to action, in order to generate innovation, social capital and entrepreneurship. Our first output is the newborn “Spanish4Fun”, creative events to expand the knowledge of Spanish Culture and Language.

First “Spanish4Fun” event was addressed to the iconic gazpacho soup and the well-known Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar´s imagery…Then we made a tour to Argentina, tasted the typical breakfast in Buenos Aires and delighted with “The secret in their eyes” movie, after that we brought the Paella to the heart of Seoul…One workshop was held in the Seorae Global Village Center and the second one in Hillside Club House in cooperation with the FoD International Cooking Class.

And now we are pleased to announce that this month two more “Spanish4Fun” & Cooking LAB events are taking place, once again in the Seorae Global Village Center and in Hillside Residence.

BASQUE COUNTRY WORKSHOP HILLSIDE(1)This time our workshop will be devoted to Euskadi, the Basque Country. We will have a cooking show (Marmitako, a delicious Tuna Pot) and a “pintxo” cooking lab.

The “pintxo” is the well-known Basque hors d’oeuvre or snack, typically eaten in bars and this cooking lab means a real challenge: we want you not only to enjoy yourself and learn more about the Spanish cuisine and culture, but to have an unforgettable experience by creating your own “pintxo”, in fact by co-creating it with other people.

In our pursuit of innovation and inspired by one of the most famous chef in the world, Ferrán Adriá, we invite people to be cook!.

Our plan is to make a virtual travel to the Basque Country and discover not only the new Basque cuisine, but also their ways of eating (for there are features of the way of preparing and sharing food unique to the area) and after that we will introduce the traditional Marmitako recipe…

And while our fish stew is on the fire, we can image that we are in the kitchen of one of a Basque-style “pintxos” bar ready to prepare a new “pintxo”…

A short talk and useful tips will provide people with insights and inspiration to create a simple and tasty “pintxo”, or a sophisticated and elaborate one, or even a shocking cuisine fusion piece…Are you ready to join?.BASQUE COUNTRY WORKSHOP(2)